Hotel Skeppsholmen

Sustainable Stunner

fromUSD $148*night
Includes all taxes & fees
*Based on a 3 night stay, from Sat, Jan 29 to Tue, Feb 1. view this rate

Stockholm, Sweden

Hotel Skeppsholmen

Sustainable Stunner

What it is

A 1699 former home for the Royal Marines turned into a modernist eco hotel, with a buzzing Swedish restaurant, historic tennis court and sleek, Nordic-style rooms designed by renowned Swedish architecture firm Claesson Koivisto Rune.

What it isn't

Peckish. Guests start the day with an abundant—and included—housemade Swedish breakfast, including everything from smoked salmon to muesli.

What we think

There is a “welcome home” feeling the moment you step foot in Hotel Skeppsholmen, which is especially comforting when you’ve never actually been there before. Staffers treat guests like family, thanks in part to the familial, sustainable ethos of the hotel itself. Standard rooms in the centuries-old house are charmingly cozy—think “hygge”—at 150 square feet, but equipped with prime panoramas over the exultant gardens beyond the windows, plus luxe Swedish Duxiana beds, stocked minibars and Byredo toiletries. Upgrade to a roomier Junior Suite for a sitting area and workplace, plus fresh flowers at check in; the 688-square-foot Officer’s Suite is tucked into the eaves of an attic and fitted with a deep soaking tub, a fairytale roof window and a separate living room ideal for sipping your morning jolt as the rest of your party snoozes.

You're here because

Pack your whites. The hotel’s waterfront tennis court was built by King Oscar II in 1882 and was the very first al fresco court of its kind in Sweden.

The Moment

Brunch is always fun, but in Stockholm? It’s full throttle. Here, that means you start healthfully (pumpkin and avocado toast) and end with ice cream topped French toast because, why not?

Restaurants & Bars

- Langa Raden

Location

On storybook Skeppsholmen island, just a block from the ferry dock and 8 blocks from the Stockholm Toy Museum, where you can see some 40,000 toys from the 17th century to today in subterranean caverns.

Gröna gången 1
Stockholm, 111 86
AB, Sweden